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Want to sleep a little more? Hitting That Snooze Button Isn’t Always Bad, Study Finds

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The snooze button has gotten a bad rap over the years, but a new study published in the Journal of Sleep Research suggests that snoozing doesn’t always mean losing.

Researchers at Stockholm University in Sweden found that the theft of these a few extra minutes of sleep could actually support the awakening process.

Participants were evaluated in two separate studies, according to a university news release.

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In the first study, 1,732 people answered questions about their morning wake-up routines.

Many of them reported using the snooze button, mainly because they were too tired to wake up right away.

Researchers at Stockholm University in Sweden have found that stealing a few extra minutes of sleep can aid the wakefulness process. (iStock)

In a follow-up study, 31 people who regularly used the snooze button were analyzed in a sleep laboratory over two nights.

One morning they were allowed to nap for 30 minutes.

The other morning they had to get up straight away.

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On mornings when they slept, participants performed better on cognitive tests.

They also showed no negative effects on their mood, sleepiness, or cortisol levels (stress).

“Our results show that those who sleep on average sleep slightly less and feel more sleepy in the morning than those who never sleep,” Tina Sundelin, a researcher at Stockholm University and lead author of the paper, said in the press release.

Man hitting snooze button

On mornings when they slept, participants performed better on cognitive tests. They also showed no negative effects on their mood, sleepiness, or cortisol (stress) levels. (iStock)

“But napping had no negative effects on cortisol release, morning fatigue, mood, or sleep quality throughout the night.”

The researchers also noticed some positive results, including a “decreased likelihood of waking up from deep sleep,” Sundelin noted.

“When participants were allowed to take a nap, they also thought a little faster as soon as they got up,” she added.

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The study had certain limitations. For example, it only included people who sleep regularly and already find it easy to go back to sleep after each alarm.

“Napping probably isn’t for everyone,” Sundelin added.

Fox News Digital has contacted the researchers for additional comment.

Telephone repeat

In a 2022 study by the University of Notre Dame, researchers found that those who used the snooze button were less active during the day and “experienced more disruption” during their sleep. (iStock)

The snooze button has been around since 1956, when General Electric-Telechron introduced its “Snooz-Alarm,” which provided about 10 minutes of extra sleep by pressing the bar on top.

In a 2022 study by the University of Notre Dame, researchers found that those who used the snooze feature were less active during the day and “experienced more disruption” during their sleep, according to a press release.

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However, snoozers did not report feeling tired more often or taking more naps than non-snoozers.

“There may be cases where hitting the snooze button is actually beneficial,” says Stephen Mattingly, lead author of the study, in the press release.

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“If you take a nap and you’re more alert when you drive to work, that could be a benefit and a useful benefit. If it reduces caffeine dependence, that’s another.”

For more health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

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