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US risks reverting to its traditional policy of ‘caesura’ India with Pakistan under Biden


https://sputniknews.com/20220927/us-risks-returning-to-its-traditional-policy-of-hyphenating-india-with-pakistan-under-biden-1101270416.html

US risks reverting to its traditional policy of ‘caesura’ India with Pakistan under Biden

US risks reverting to its traditional policy of ‘caesura’ India with Pakistan under Biden

Since the Cold War, successive US administrations have been accused of “severing” ties between India and Pakistan, meaning they have adopted a strike policy… 27.09.2022, Sputnik International

2022-09-27T12:06+0000

2022-09-27T12:06+0000

2022-09-27T12:06+0000

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war on terror

Narendra Modi

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US policy on the India-Pakistan disputes has manifested itself in a response to Pakistan’s concerns over the Kashmir dispute, with several US presidents, including Donald Trump, offering mediation to resolve the dispute. This has caused friction with New Delhi, which has consistently maintained that the Kashmir dispute is a bilateral issue and rejected any outside interference. talk” about terrorism, with Trump even suspending Washington’s military assistance program to Islamabad in 2018 for his covert support of the Taliban. After coming to power in 2020, the Biden administration refused to normalize ties with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, who said he hasn’t received a single call from the US president despite Islamabad being an ally key in the so-called War on Terror. power in April, with Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari making two visits to Washington to meet with his counterpart, Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Now Indian military veterans have doubled down on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s concerns over increased defense cooperation between the US and Pakistan, arguing that the Biden administration could run the risk of ‘cutting’ to New Delhi and Islamabad as part of its policy towards the region. ally” during the so-called War on Terror, was used as a means of “deterring India”, which has always had a stronger conventional army than Pakistan. t, we were deterred,” he said. The former Indian general also recalled a dogfight between the Indian Air Force (IAF) MIG-29 Bison jet and the Pakistani F-16 that took place over the region of Jammu and -Kashmir in February 2019. New Delhi claimed that one of its pilots shot down a more advanced F-16 jet during the aerial encounter. two Cold War allies since 2018. “The United States will always need a land route to Afghanistan that it could use in an emergency and to maintain a counterterrorism strike capability. The United States has also used Pakistani airspace in the past to conduct counterterrorism operations over the horizon in Afghanistan as part of a pact signed after 9/11,” Asthana said. Asthana also argued that “cooperation” with the United States would help Pakistan. overcome the current economic crisis caused by the depletion of foreign exchange reserves and exacerbated by the devastating floods. of the US government. The geopolitical expert said a bailout from the United States and Western institutions is Pakistan’s ‘best hope’ of supporting its economy, as Beijing has so far given no assurances to restructure its loans in Islamabad. According to some estimates, it accounts for 30% of Pakistan’s overall external debt. “A continued US-Pakistan relationship serves the interests of both parties,” Asthana said. side,” said Matheswaran, who also believed the Pakistani military was “heavily influenced” by the United States. * under UN sanctions for terrorist activities

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Since the Cold War, successive US administrations have been accused of “cutting” ties between India and Pakistan, meaning they have adopted a policy of balancing Washington’s relationship between New Delhi and Islamabad.

US policy regarding the differences between India and Pakistan has manifested itself in the form of addressing Pakistan’s concerns over the Kashmir dispute, with several US presidents, including Donald Trump, offering mediation to resolve the dispute.

This has caused friction with New Delhi, which has always maintained that the Kashmir dispute is a bilateral issue and has rejected any outside interference.

However, as the Trump administration began negotiations with the Taliban* towards the end of the so-called war on terror, the United States became increasingly concerned about Islamabad’s “double talk” on the terrorism, with Trump even suspending Washington’s military assistance program to Islamabad. in 2018 for his covert support of the Taliban.

After coming to power in 2020, the Biden administration refused to normalize ties with then-Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, who complained that he had not received a single call from the US president despite Islamabad was a key ally in the so-called war on terror.

Khan has since maintained that he was ousted from power by a parliamentary no-confidence motion that was “prompted” by the Biden administration.

However, relations between the United States and Pakistan have normalized somewhat since Shehbaz Sharif came to power in April, with Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari making two visits to Washington to meet with his counterpart the Secretary of State. State Antony Blinken.

During their last meeting on Monday, Blinken told Zardari the importance of managing a “responsible relationship” with India.

Now Indian military veterans have doubled down on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s concerns over increased defense cooperation between the US and Pakistan, arguing the Biden administration could run the risk of ‘cutting’ to New Delhi and Islamabad as part of its policy towards the Region.

“For much of the past decade, the United States has turned a blind eye to India raising concerns about Pakistan-backed cross-border terrorism. The United States is only concerned with its own interests or with terrorism that directly affects it,” said Major General Shashi Bhushan Asthana, an Indian army veteran who is currently a military subject matter expert at the think tank. United Services Institution of India based in New Delhi. Sputnik.

Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar addresses the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly at the UN headquarters in New York on September 24, 2022. - Sputnik International, 1920, 26.09.2022

‘You’re not fooling anyone,’ says Jaishankar, lambasting US over F-16 package in Pakistan

Asthana explained that much of the American military equipment that Islamabad procured from the United States when it was a “major non-NATO ally” during the so-called war on terrorism, was used as a means of “deterring India”, which has always had a more powerful conventional army than Pakistan.

“To some extent we were deterred,” he said.

“All US military hardware acquired by Pakistan is intended to increase Pakistan’s combat capability on its eastern flank with India,” the military veteran said.

The former Indian general also recalled a dogfight between the Indian Air Force (IAF) MIG-29 Bison jet and the Pakistani F-16 that took place over the region of Jammu and -Kashmir in February 2019. New Delhi claimed one of its pilots shot down a more advanced plane. Jet F-16 during the air encounter.

Explaining Pakistan’s geostrategic importance to the United States, Asthana said the United States would always keep an “option” open in Pakistan, regardless of the friction between the two Cold War allies since 2018.

“The United States will always need a land route to Afghanistan that it could use in an emergency and to maintain a counterterrorism strike capability. The United States has also in the past used Pakistani airspace conduct counter-terrorism operations over the horizon in Afghanistan under a pact signed after 9/11,” Asthana said.

The Indian expert continued that as far as Pakistan is concerned, its military relations with the United States have always remained strong.

Asthana also argued that “Cooperation” with the United States would help Pakistan overcome the current economic crisis caused by the depletion of foreign exchange reserves and exacerbated by the devastating floods.

He alleged that the Washington-based International Monetary Fund (IMF) would not disburse the recently approved $1.1 billion bailout funds to Pakistan without a “nod” from the US government.

The geopolitical expert claimed that a bailout from the United States and Western institutions is Pakistan’s ‘best hope’ of supporting its economy, as Beijing has so far given no assurances to restructure its loans in Islamabad. According to some estimates, it accounts for 30% of Pakistan’s overall external debt.

“A continued US-Pakistan relationship serves the interests of both parties,” Asthana said.

Air Marshal (Retired) Muthumanikam Matheswaran, who heads Chennai-based think tank The Peninsula Foundation, echoed those sentiments, saying continued defense cooperation between Pakistan and the US would also help the Biden administration keep Islamabad close given the “all-weather” friendship between Islamabad and Beijing.

“The United States will continue to provide piecemeal insertions to the Pakistani military to keep them on their side,” said Matheswaran, who also believed the Pakistani military was “heavily influenced” by the United States.

* under UN sanctions for terrorist activities



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