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Senegalese president urges African leaders to invest more in lifesaving vaccines


https://sputniknews.com/20221211/senegals-president-urges-african-leaders-to-invest-more-in-life-saving-vaccines-1105357864.html

Senegalese president urges African leaders to invest more in lifesaving vaccines

Senegalese president urges African leaders to invest more in lifesaving vaccines

In this article, you will discover that the Senegalese president is urging African leaders to invest more in life-saving vaccines

2022-12-11T14:30+0000

2022-12-11T14:30+0000

2022-12-11T14:30+0000

Africa

West Africa

Senegal

vaccines

vaccination

sickness

cholera

immunization

world health organization (who)

measles

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Senegalese President Macky Sall has called on African leaders to allocate more funds for routine immunization in Africa.The President made the call during the Forum on Immunization and Polio Eradication in Africa, which aimed to address the problem of the alarming drop in the number of children receiving life-saving vaccines as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Sall pointed out that in 2021, around 25 million children worldwide were unvaccinated due to the pandemic. The Addis Declaration on Immunization and the Immunization Agenda 2030, which commit to providing life-saving vaccines to all Africans, whoever they are and wherever they live. The president stressed that vaccination rates should be restored in order to deal with the resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases. In particular, he gave the example of the disease poliomyelitis, which was declared defeated by the World Health Organization in 2020, while Nigeria – the only country in Africa that still had the virus – n hadn’t recorded a case of infection for months. However, the President pointed out that cases of poliomyelitis have been reported in communities where vaccination has not been carried out. Sall also called on African leaders to expand vaccine production on the continent. Catherine Russell, Executive Director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), agreed that children’s lives are at risk due to the decline in routine vaccinations against deadly diseases. Meanwhile, the deputy director of the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ahmed Ouma, assured that the organization is committed to re-engage “around the Addis Declaration on Immunization to increase access to vaccines. , improve surveillance and response to epidemics and invest in the production of vaccines in Africa against measles, yellow fever, cholera and diphtheria.According to data from the official website of the Forum on Immunization and Eradication of Polio in Africa, due to COVID-19, at least 16 African countries suspended polio vaccination campaigns for four months in 2020, resulting in tens of millions of children not receiving polio vaccines and that 24 African countries were affected by outbreaks of poliovirus variants in November 2022. In addition, for the same reason, the coverage of the third dose of vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and co queluche (DTP3) increased from 76% in 2019 to 73% in 2021, reaching the lowest level of coverage since 2013 As for the first dose of measles (MCV1) coverage in Africa, it increased from 73% in 2019 to 70% in 2021. In 2021, measles killed 128,000 people worldwide. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV3) third dose coverage in Africa has also dropped from 66% in 2018 to 63% in 2021. In addition, statistics show that other vaccine-preventable diseases, such as cholera, are also on the rise in a number of African countries.

https://sputniknews.com/20221208/who-delivers-first-batch-of-potential-ebola-vaccine-to-uganda-1105195916.html

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vaccines in africa, investments in vaccines in africa, deadly diseases in africa, measles in africa, cholera in africa

vaccines in africa, investments in vaccines in africa, deadly diseases in africa, measles in africa, cholera in africa

The COVID-19 pandemic has halted global gains in immunization, with vaccination rates falling to levels not seen in nearly a decade.

Senegalese President Macky Sall has called on African leaders to allocate more funds for routine immunization in Africa.

The President made the call during the Forum on Immunization and Polio Eradication in Africa, which aimed to address the alarming decline in the number of children receiving life-saving vaccines as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. 19.

Sall pointed out that in 2021, around 25 million children worldwide have not been vaccinated due to the pandemic.

Therefore, the President reminded African leaders of the importance of implementing the Addis Declaration on Immunization and the Immunization Agenda 2030, which commit to providing lifesaving vaccines to all Africans, regardless of they are and wherever they live.

The president stressed that vaccination rates should be restored in order to deal with the resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases. In particular, he gave the example of the disease poliomyelitis, which was declared defeated by the World Health Organization in 2020, while Nigeria – the only country in Africa that still had the virus – n hadn’t recorded a case of infection for months. However, the president pointed out that cases of poliomyelitis have been reported in communities where vaccination has not been carried out.

“It must be said loud and clear that vaccination is a safe intervention…Vaccination saves lives…prevents human suffering and disability, and it helps to strengthen children’s immune systems,” the President emphasized.

Sall also called on African leaders to expand vaccine production on the continent.

Catherine Russell, Executive Director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), agreed that children’s lives are at risk due to the decline in routine vaccinations against deadly diseases.

“We urgently need to catch up and expand our reach to prevent dangerous outbreaks of diseases such as polio and measles, especially among children who have yet to receive a single vaccination. We know this is possible if we all work together to reach every child,” she stressed.

Meanwhile, Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Deputy Director Ahmed Ouma assured that the organization is committed to re-engaging “around the Addis Declaration on Immunization to increase access. to vaccines, improve surveillance and response to epidemics and invest in the production of vaccines in Africa”. .”

Similarly, Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), called for coordinated regional and global action to protect populations against outbreaks of poliomyelitis, measles, yellow fever, cholera and diphtheria.

According to data from the official website of the Forum on Immunization and Polio Eradication in Africa, due to COVID-19, at least 16 African countries have suspended polio immunization campaigns for four months in 2020, which deprived tens of millions of children of poliomyelitis. vaccines and causing 24 African countries to be affected by outbreaks of poliovirus variants in November 2022.
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Moreover, for the same reason, coverage of the third dose of the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP3) vaccine increased from 76% in 2019 to 73% in 2021, reaching the lowest level of coverage since 2013.

Measles first dose (MCV1) coverage in Africa increased from 73% in 2019 to 70% in 2021. In 2021, measles killed 128,000 people worldwide.

Coverage of the third dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV3) in Africa also fell from 66% in 2018 to 63% in 2021.

Furthermore, statistics show that other vaccine-preventable diseases, such as cholera, are currently also on the rise in a number of African countries.



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