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Scaring for fun helps bond and ease stress – Study


https://sputniknews.com/20221030/frightening-yourself-for-fun-helps-building-bonds-soothe-stress—study-1102835682.html

Scaring for fun helps bond and ease stress – Study

Scaring for fun helps bond and ease stress – Study

According to science, nearly 40 million people in the United States suffer from an anxiety disorder in any given year, or nearly 18% of the population. Some of us succeed… 30.10.2022, Sputnik International

2022-10-30T00:14+0000

2022-10-30T00:14+0000

2022-10-30T00:13+0000

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Fear, which is an emotional response to threats, alerts us to danger, and when we are afraid, our nervous system floods our body with adrenaline and our brain with dopamine and noradrenaline, which can improve our mood. Now, new research looking at people who chase fear for fun suggests it can help quell anxiety and even help us bond with others – plus make us a bit more resilient. Essentially, as long as we know there’s no real threat, researchers say a little fear on purpose can do us good. At least that’s what researchers from the Recreational Fear Lab at Aarhus University in Denmark discovered when they realized through their surveys that during the pandemic, horror movie fans were showing more great signs of psychological resilience. The idea is that doing scary things for fun, like watching horror movies or visiting haunted houses, helps people deal with their fears in real life by helping them regulate their reactions. The findings were echoed by a separate study led by Margee Kerr, a sociologist at the University of Pittsburgh, which found that people who frequent the “extreme” haunted houses – those who employ actors to reach out and grab the participants, or inflicting greater fears like electric shocks – feel their mood improves afterwards, and often report less stress and fatigue. Researchers also suggest doing scary things with a group of friends since the shared activity can help you feel closer to each other. Some theories presented by members of the Fear Lab suggest that people with anxiety like to scare themselves because it can give them a sense of control, especially if the threats are not real. People who enter haunted houses are allowed to leave whenever they wish; they are actually not in danger. Being able to “pause” or close their eyes during times when they are overwhelmed are tactics that allow participants to manage their fear and move beyond comfort zones – which can help boost mood, overcome emotions difficult and/or to develop further as people. However, to feel the benefits of scaring yourself, you have to actually enjoy the activity, which means you can’t just throw yourself into the scariest thing you can find, officials point out. “Try the softer stuff first – a kids horror movie or a neighborhood hangout where you can see the zipper on the monster’s back,” says Clasen, who also suggests looking for a “scarier version. of something you already love, whether it’s books, movies, or podcasts. As Kerr reminds us, “Fear of hobbies is about choice.”

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According to science, nearly 40 million people in the United States suffer from an anxiety disorder in any given year, or nearly 18% of the population. Some of us manage our anxiety by meditating, some by maintaining a healthy regimen of regular physical activity, and others by . . . BOO. . . get scared!

Fear, which is an emotional response to threats, alerts us to danger, and when we are afraid, our nervous system floods our body with adrenaline and our brain with dopamine and noradrenaline, which can improve our mood. Now, new research looking at people who chase fear for fun suggests it can help quell anxiety and even help us bond with others – plus make us a bit more resilient.

Essentially, as long as we know there’s no real threat, researchers say a little on purpose fear can be good for us. At least that’s what researchers from the Recreational Fear Lab at Aarhus University in Denmark discovered when they realized with their surveys that during the pandemic, horror movie fans have shown greater signs of psychological resilience.

The idea is that doing scary things for fun, like watching scary movies or visiting haunted houses, helps people deal with their fears in real life by helping them regulate their reactions.

“It’s like putting a fighter pilot in a simulator”, said Mathias Clasen, Laboratory Director and Associate Professor of Literature and Media at Aarhus University. “You learn what emotions look like and how to control them.”

The findings were echoed by a separate study led by Margee Kerr, a sociologist at the University of Pittsburgh, which found that people who frequent “extreme” haunted houses – those that employ actors to reach out and grab attendees, or inflict higher stakes fears like electric shocks – they feel like their mood has improved afterward, and they often notice less stress and fatigue.

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Researchers also suggest doing spooky things with a group of friends, as the shared activity can help you feel closer to one another.

Some theories presented by members of the Fear Lab suggest that people with anxiety like to scare themselves because it can give them a sense of control, especially if the threats aren’t real.

People who enter haunted houses are allowed to exit whenever they wish; they are not Actually in no danger. Being able to “pause” or close their eyes during times when they are overwhelmed is a tactic that allows participants to manage their fear and move beyond comfort zones – which can help boost mood, overcome difficult emotions and/or to help develop more as people.

However, to feel the benefits of scaring yourself, you have to actually enjoy the activity, which means you can’t just throw yourself into the scariest thing you can find, officials point out.

“Try the softer things first – a kids horror movie or a neighborhood hangout where you can see the zipper on the monster’s back,” says Clasen, who also suggests looking for a “scarier version. of something you already love, whether it’s books, movies, or podcasts. As Kerr reminds us, “Fear of recreation is about choice.”



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