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Missouri farmers prepare for possible railroad strike


The White House is discussing contingency plans as threats of a possible railroad shutdown continue. The federal government is trying to see how it could use its authority to keep critical supply chains open. In Orrick, Missouri, farmers say even a short strike would spell disaster for their business, and customers would pay the price. Union negotiators have been working on wage increases and back pay for hours worked since 2020. The strike deadline is Friday. Farmer Tom Waters says his 3,500 acres of soybeans are looking good, but getting the product anywhere is becoming a concern. “We have a big crop here. Bigger than normal. No more worries about this haul,” Waters said. Waters and farmers across the country have plenty to worry about. A railroad strike is looming and the harvest is just around the corner. “Transportation is a huge part of the cost to the consumer,” Waters said. How long will it be before consumers feel the effects of a train strike? Not long. The wheat has already been harvested and is in They need this grain to be transported to make room for the fields filled with soybeans and corn. “There’s a lot of bad things that can happen, so there’s a lot of fear,” Waters said. , crops left and dying in the field, and food prices soaring. But there is hope. “We need the government to step in and do something about it. The impact is going to be incredible nationally, and I don’t believe there will be one.” nobody in the country, it won’t affect,” Waters said. possible strike, farmers say grain shipments could stop as early as Wednesday to avoid getting them stuck on the tracks.

The White House is discussing contingency plans as threats of a possible railroad closure continue.

The federal government is trying to see how it could use its authority to keep essential supply chains open.

In Orrick, Missouri, farmers say even a short strike would spell disaster for their business and customers would pay the price.

Union negotiators have been working on wage increases and back pay for hours worked since 2020. The strike deadline is Friday.

Farmer Tom Waters says his 3,500 acres of soybeans look good, but getting the product anywhere is becoming a problem.

“We have a big crop here. Bigger than normal. No more worries about this haul,” Waters said.

Waters and farmers across the country have plenty to worry about. A railway strike is looming and the harvest is fast approaching.

“Transportation is a huge part of the cost to the consumer,” Waters said.

How long will it be before consumers feel the effects of a train strike? Not long.

The wheat has already been harvested and is in the grain elevators. They need that grain to be moved to make room for fields full of soybeans and corn.

“There’s a lot of bad things that can happen, so there’s a lot of fear,” Waters said.

There are fears that there will be no more room for storage, crops will lie dormant and die in the fields and food prices will skyrocket. But there is hope.

“We need the government to step in and do something about it. The impact is going to be incredible nationally, and I don’t believe there’s a single person in the country that won’t be affected,” Waters said.

Following a possible strike, farmers say grain shipments could stop as early as Wednesday to avoid getting them stuck on the tracks.

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