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How daylight saving time can affect body and mind


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How daylight saving time can affect body and mind

How daylight saving time can affect body and mind

Although disrupting sleep patterns can make a person more vulnerable health-wise and increase the likelihood of a stroke or heart attack, however… 07.10.2022, Sputnik International

2022-10-07T18:32+0000

2022-10-07T18:32+0000

2022-10-07T18:32+0000

time

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The practice of moving your clock forwards and then backwards each year as part of the daylight saving time system can apparently generate adverse effects on well-being due to its interference with the circadian rhythm. Daylight saving time is used by several countries around the world. Whatever the economic benefits of daylight saving time, disrupting people’s sleep patterns could cause some pretty serious health issues, MailOnline pointed out. For example, Professor Russell Foster of the University of Oxford, whom the journal touts as “one of the world’s leading circadian rhythm experts”, warns that a combination of sleep deprivation and circadian rhythm disruption could lead to a stroke. “We have this clock, and it tunes every aspect of our physiology and behavior to the 24-hour cycle of light and dark,” he said. “We see an increase in blood pressure. For example, between 6 a.m. and noon is 50% more likely to have a stroke anyway “more likely to slip into that depressive state.” “If you add a disruptor, such as sleep loss or circadian rhythm disruption, you will be more likely to slip into a dangerous state, such as severe mental illness such as schizophrenia and bipolar,” Foster explained. Another circadian rhythm expert, Dr John O’Neill of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, also suggested that altering clocks could lead to a small increase in the risk of heart attacks among the population. .Comparing the effect of changing clocks to “being an hour jet lag”, O’Neill noted that “it’s really such a modest challenge to your circadian system that the vast majority of people deal with w” But because that this is happening at the population level, you can see a slight increase in the frequency of heart attacks,” he admitted. The newspaper also pointed out that, by turning the clock back one hour in the fall basically results in darker evenings as the day gets shorter, some people may experience what is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, i.e. Winter Depression, the symptoms of which are “similar to depression and include persistent low mood and difficulty concentrating”.

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Although disrupting sleep patterns can make a person more vulnerable health-wise and increase the likelihood of a stroke or heart attack, even slightly, it could also lead to depression.

The practice of moving your clock forwards and then backwards each year as part of the daylight saving time system can apparently generate adverse effects on well-being due to its interference with the circadian rhythm. Daylight saving time is used by several countries around the world.

Whatever the economic benefits of daylight saving time, disrupting people’s sleep patterns could cause some pretty serious health issues, MailOnline pointed out.

For example, Professor Russell Foster of the University of Oxford, whom the journal touts as “one of the world’s leading circadian rhythm experts”, warns that a combination of sleep deprivation and circadian rhythm disruption could lead to a stroke.

“We have this clock, and it adjusts every aspect of our physiology and behavior to the 24-hour cycle of light and dark,” he said. “We are seeing an increase in blood pressure. For example, between 6 a.m. and 12 p.m. there is a 50% higher chance of having a stroke anyway.

“If you’re forced out of bed even earlier, you put more stress on the system, which means you’re less able to cope,” Foster added. “For most of us, that’s fine because we have healthy, robust metabolisms, but where you’re at increased risk, the transition to daylight saving time can essentially put additional stress on our biology. and make us more prone to disease.”

The professor also said there is evidence linking sleep deprivation and depression, and that disrupting one’s sleep and sleeping less makes one vulnerable and “more likely to slip into that depressed state”.

“If you add a disruptor, like sleep loss or circadian rhythm disruption, you’re more likely to slip into a dangerous state, such as serious mental illness like schizophrenia and bipolar,” Foster explained.

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Another circadian rhythm expert, Dr John O’Neill of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, also suggested that changing clocks could lead to a slight increase in the risk of heart attack among the population.

“If circadian rhythms are chronically disrupted, for example in shift work, we know that’s really bad for your long-term health,” he said, as quoted by the newspaper. “It’s very rare for someone to die from it, but the risk associated with shift work is equivalent to smoking cigarettes.”

Comparing the effect of changing clocks to “getting an hour jet lag”, O’Neill noted that “it’s really such a modest challenge to your circadian system that the vast majority of people feel fit perfectly”.

“But because it’s happening at the population level, you can see a slight increase in the frequency of heart attacks,” he admitted.

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The newspaper also pointed out that because turning the clock back one hour in autumn essentially results in darker evenings as the day gets shorter, some people may suffer from what is known as affective disorder. seasonal aka winter depression whose symptoms are “similar to depression and include persistent low mood and difficulty concentrating.



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