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Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin appealed his murder conviction ahead of the 90-day deadline Thursday.

Chauvin was convicted last April of third degree murder, unintentional second degree murder and second degree manslaughter for kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for nine minutes during an arrest in May 2020. He was sentenced to 22 and a half years in prison.

The sentence was higher than the alleged 12-and-a-half years, but Judge Peter Cahill agreed with prosecutors that there were aggravating factors in Floyd’s death.

Chauvin said he was appearing on appeal because he was denied a public defender. He has requested a stay of the appeal until he can get a lawyer, according to FOX 9 in Minneapolis.

CHAUVIN NOT GUILTY PLA FOR ALLEGED CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATION

He said he had no income beyond prison pay and although the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association paid his legal fees during the trial that ended after his conviction, according to the station.

The former officer cited 14 reasons for his appeal, including that the trial was not moved to another county, the jury was not sequestered and some were “clearly biased” and the prosecution’s allocation of third degree murder, WCCO-TV in Minneapolis reported.

Last week, the Minneapolis Supreme Court overturned the third degree murder conviction of Mohamed Noor, a former Minneapolis officer who shot dead Australian Justine Ruszczyk Damond. He will be sentenced for manslaughter.

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Chauvin also pleaded not guilty last week to violating the civil rights of a teenager in a separate 2017 case that involved coercion similar to that used on Floyd. He is also accused of allegedly violating Floyd’s civil rights and has pleaded not guilty.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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