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Colleges add COVID-19 restrictions as classes prepare to resume

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Colleges add COVID-19 restrictions as classes prepare to resume

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Colleges across the country continue to format learning environments amid a spike in cases of the omicron variant of COVID-19, installing restrictions that have halted campus life as some classes move online and student activities remain limited.

At Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, students and staff will be required to wear either an N95 or KN95 mask or a combination of a cloth mask with a surgical mask upon returning to campus, the school announced Friday. Masks will be distributed in several places of the university.

Additionally, the school has imposed a Feb. 1 deadline for booster shots, and students on campus will be tested twice a week. Those who return to live on campus will be tested and quarantined until they test negative.

HBCU MEDICAL STUDENTS DONATED $10,000 WITH CARE ACT FUNDING

Close up of sign for Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. On Friday, university officials outlined a series of measures to begin campus life amid a surge in COVID-19 cases.
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Dining halls will switch to take-out service and all non-academic indoor events of 50 people or more until February 6 will require special permission.

“COVID is a serious and exhausting challenge, but it’s important to emphasize how much better prepared we are to deal with the virus now than we were when it first emerged nearly two years ago” reads the joint message from school officials.

Classes resume on January 24.

Several other universities have already announced plans to move to online courses early this year, including duke university, American University, Georgetown University, Stanford University, Northwestern University, Belmont University, and more University of California system campus.

In a letter to Georgetown school officials, the Conservative and Libertarian Student Association of Georgetown Law opposed virtual teaching since the school has implemented mandates for vaccines and masks.

Colleges add COVID-19 restrictions as classes prepare to resume

 | News Today

Healy Hall with the statue of Georgetown University founder John Carroll in front and a few people walking in the background.
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“Every student entering campus in the upcoming semester will be fully immunized with boosters, unless they have received one of the University’s illusory exemptions,” wrote Luke Bunting and Elana Quint, co-chairs of the group. “If these vaccines are effective, as the school continually claims, why is virtual teaching – an option that the university and law center recognize has significant costs for learning, engagement and well-being? students – even an option in a post-vaccine word?”

Opposition to distance learning has prompted some students to seek refunds or discounts from colleges.

Other higher education institutions have decided to push back the dates for the return of undergraduate students, including Princeton University, which extended its date from January 7 to Friday January 14. 24.

The University of Texas at Dallas was originally targeting Jan. 10 for student return, but postponed it to Tuesday to “evaluate the progress of the virus and…give our faculty, staff, and students a bit more time to prepare if our teaching arrangements need to be adjusted,” the school said.

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Faculty members who were scheduled to teach in person are encouraged to move their classes online, school officials said last week. The university will not perform random COVID-19 testing, which will be available to people with symptoms or who are in close contact with someone known or suspected to have had COVID-19.

Colleges add COVID-19 restrictions as classes prepare to resume

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