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breaking news The chemicals used in the Pulwama attack bombs are sourced through Amazon, says Cait


Selling marijuana on Amazon’s e-commerce portal is not Amazon’s new and first offense, the Confederation of Traders of India (CAIT) said in a statement.

In early 2019, the chemicals to make the improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that were used in the Pulwama terrorist attack that resulted in the death of 40 CRPF soldiers, were also purchased through the e-commerce portal, added.

The NIA during the investigation of the Pulwama case revealed this fact in its March 2020 report, the news also appeared widely in the media in March 2020. In addition to other material, ammonium nitrate was also purchased, which is an article smuggling in India, through the portal.

CAIT National Chairman BC Bhartia and Secretary General Praveen Khandelwal said that according to reports available in the public domain during initial NIA questioning, the arrested person revealed that he used his Amazon online shopping account. to purchase chemicals to make improvised explosive devices, batteries, and other accessories. It was determined by a forensic probe that the explosives used in the attack were ammonium nitrate, nitroglycerin, etc.

CAIT said that since facilitation of the sale of contraband with ammonium nitrate was used against our soldiers, a case of treason should be filed against Amazon and its officials. It is the result of the lukewarm attitude of policy makers and officials that is allowing e-commerce portals to do whatever they want, the CAIT statement said.

It is also very surprising how this sensational affair was killed and no further action was taken for the sale of contraband items.

Bhartia and Khandelwal said that ammonium nitrate was declared a prohibited item in 2011 so a notice was issued listing the dangerous grades of ammonium nitrate under the Explosives Act of 1884 and prohibiting its open sale, purchase and manufacture. in India. Ammonium nitrate was found to be the main explosive in the bombs used to set off explosions in busy and crowded areas. Before Mumbai, ammonium nitrate was used in the explosions in Varanasi and Malegaon in 2006 and in the serial explosions in Delhi in 2008.

The 2016 CAIT is demanding a codified law and rules for e-commerce, but unfortunately no steps have been taken so far that reflect the unfortunate situation. What could be worse than acquiring chemicals used to make bombs and target our great soldiers. This case must be reopened and the responsible persons who administered the Amazon portal must be prosecuted in accordance with the law, CAIT said.

Ammonium nitrate is a white crystalline solid that is produced in large industrial quantities. Its main use is as a source of nitrogen for fertilizers, but it is also used to create explosives for mining. If a fire comes, the chemical reaction will be much more intense. When ammonium nitrate explodes, it can release toxic gases, including nitrogen. Oxides and ammonia gas that could be dangerous to the people who live around it.

Bhartia and Khandelwal urged Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Interior Minister Amit Shah to immediately intervene directly on the matter. It has also urged Commerce Minister Piyush Goyal to immediately publish the e-commerce rules, e-commerce policy and a new press release to replace press release n. 2 of the FDI policy.

CAIT has urged the Union government to carry out a thorough and exhaustive investigation of the business model of large e-commerce players to ensure that no sales of prohibited items or anti-national activities take place on e-commerce portals and that the responsibility is fixed in the market. Making a strict KYC of the seller and the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning technology allow the sale of goods or the provision of services only that are legal.

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