World News

Ancient Palmyra May Have Fell From Hunger, New Study Says


https://sputniknews.com/20220923/ancient-palmyra-could-have-fallen-because-of-hunger-new-study-shows-1101113634.html

Ancient Palmyra May Have Fell From Hunger, New Study Says

Ancient Palmyra May Have Fell From Hunger, New Study Says

In 273, Emperor Aurelian destroyed the city of Palmyra, wiping out the short-lived Palmyrene Empire that challenged Rome. Its majestic ruins were only rediscovered… 23.09.2022, Sputnik International

2022-09-23T05:45+0000

2022-09-23T05:45+0000

2022-09-23T05:45+0000

science and technology

Science

new

Scandinavia

Syria

Ancient Rome

archeology

/html/head/meta[@name=”og:title”]/@contents

/html/head/meta[@name=”og:description”]/@contents

https://cdnn1.img.sputniknews.com/img/105123/63/1051236398_0:116:1250:819_1920x0_80_0_0_9fa409fd385bbe6a90d0bd3f7ba97757.jpg

A team of Scandinavian researchers from Norway and Denmark have challenged the established narrative of the fall of the ancient city of Palmyra, located in present-day Syria, adding more nuance to the bigger picture. Until recently, Roman conquest was believed to be the sole reason for the historic city’s destruction almost 2,000 years ago, as the short-lived Palmyrene empire came to an end. While the Palmyrene Rebellion was one of the most serious in the long history of the Roman Empire, it also occurred at a time when the climate in the Middle East was becoming noticeably drier. This led scholars to believe that lack of food was one of the underlying reasons for the loss of the war. One of the key questions in their study, therefore, was how much food could have been grown for a large city landlocked in the middle of the desert. Even using advanced techniques such as rainwater harvesting using dams and reservoirs, the Palmyraeans could grow food for no more than about 40,000 people in the area surrounding the city at the time. over the course of a year, the researchers found, using computer models and accounting for known factors. rainfall data. According to Dr. Iza Romanowska of Aarhus University in Denmark, food security has always been the first priority for such a large city in a very inhospitable environment. Rubina Raja, professor of classical archeology at the Aarhus University, argued that this method not only sheds light on Palmyra’s history from a new angle, but also helps to assess the key role of food security in historical development. According to Seland of the University of Bergen, the same method can be extrapolated to other historic cities, other regions and other eras. State of the Roman Empire, was ruled by Queen Zenobia. In the year 270, a new emperor ascended the throne of Rome. Zenobia challenged the Romans, who at times struggled with internal strife and civil war, seeking to establish her own son as emperor, but ended up losing. In 273, Emperor Aurelian destroyed the city, which was sacked and reduced to an insignificant city. Its majestic ruins were only rediscovered by Western travelers at the end of the 17th century, only to be partially destroyed by Daesh terrorists in 2015 during the war in Syria.

https://sputniknews.com/20220714/russian-syrian-specialists-finish-first-phase-of-restoration-of-palmyras-1700-yo-arch-of-triumph-1097319039.html

Scandinavia

Ancient Rome

2022

New

en_GB

Sputnik International

[email protected]

+74956456601

MIA “Rosiya Segodnya”

https://cdnn1.img.sputniknews.com/img/105123/63/1051236398_0:0:1160:870_1920x0_80_0_0_f2fd05289239d37bfc4898dbdea1f469.jpg

science, news, scandinavia, syria, ancient rome, archeology

science, news, scandinavia, syria, ancient rome, archeology

Subscribe

India

In 273, Emperor Aurelian destroyed the city of Palmyra, wiping out the short-lived Palmyrene Empire that challenged Rome. Its majestic ruins were only rediscovered at the end of the 17th century.

A team of Scandinavian researchers from Norway and Denmark have challenged the established narrative of the fall of the ancient city of Palmyra, located in present-day Syria, adding more nuance to the overall picture.

Until recently, Roman conquest was believed to be the sole reason for the historic city’s destruction nearly 2,000 years ago, when the short-lived Palmyrene Empire lay extinct. While the Palmyrene Rebellion was one of the most serious in the long history of the Roman Empire, it also occurred at a time when the climate in the Middle East was becoming noticeably drier. This led scholars to believe that lack of food was one of the underlying reasons for the loss of the war.

One of the key questions in their study, therefore, was how much food could have been grown for a large city landlocked in the middle of the desert. Even using advanced techniques such as rainwater harvesting using dams and reservoirs, the Palmyraeans could grow food for no more than about 40,000 people in the area surrounding the city at the time. over the course of a year, the researchers found, using computer models and accounting for known factors. precipitation data.

“Our calculations show that the opportunities for Palmyrans to feed their own population have deteriorated during this period. We therefore believe that [Queen] Zenobia and the people of Palmyra were in a forced situation. The choice was between war against the Romans or a situation where part of the city’s population risked starving,” Eivind Heldaas Seland, a professor at the University of Bergen, told national television channel NRK.

According to Dr. Iza Romanowska from Aarhus University in Denmark, food safety has always been the top priority for such a big city in a very inhospitable environment.

“We can now see how the situation has become progressively more difficult as the climate deteriorated and the population increased,” Romanowska told NRK.

Rubina Raja, a professor of classical archeology at Aarhus University, argued that this method not only sheds light on the history of Palmyra from a new angle, but also helps to assess the key role of food security in historical development. According to Seland of the University of Bergen, the same method can be extrapolated to other historic cities, other regions and other eras.

Arc de Triomphe in the historic part of Palmyra.  Before (left) and after (right) its destruction by Daesh - Sputnik International, 1920, 14.07.2022

Russian and Syrian specialists complete first phase of restoration of Palmyra’s 1,700-year-old triumphal arch

In the 3rd century AD, Palmyra, then a thriving metropolis in the Syrian desert and the capital of a short-lived breakaway state from the Roman Empire, was ruled by Queen Zenobia. In the year 270, a new emperor ascended the throne of Rome. Zenobia challenged the Romans, who at times struggled with internal strife and civil war, seeking to establish her own son as emperor, but ended up losing. In 273, Emperor Aurelian destroyed the city, which was sacked and reduced to an insignificant city. Its majestic ruins were only rediscovered by Western travelers at the end of the 17th century, only to be partially destroyed by Daesh terrorists in 2015 during the war in Syria.



sputniknews Gt

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.
Back to top button