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They will remember this Thursday afternoon for a long time. While the Airbus A330 which was to bring them to Pointe-à-Pitre (Guadeloupe), this Thursday, November 25, had taken off about 1:30 from Paris, a smell of burning and smoke on board the The aircraft forced the crew and 148 passengers to proceed to Brest.

A smell of burning and smoke on board the aircraft forced the crew and 148 passengers to make a forced stopover at Brest-Bretagne airport, in Guipavas. On the tarmac, the firefighters were watching. (Brest-Bretagne Airport)

A quick and stressful U-turn over the Atlantic. “I smelled a smell of burnt plastic (a telephone battery?) Which came from the bottom of the plane, testifies Régis, a 57-year-old Parisian. There was also a little smoke. It didn’t last long, maybe ten minutes. We had just passed Brest when the flight attendant announced that we had to turn around to land there. I felt the passengers rather serene. “

“A hyperstressing situation”: on the tarmac in Brest, the passengers of the Paris-Guadeloupe flight recount the forced landing – Brest
Régis, 57, had already experienced a similar situation over Greece. (The Telegram / Yann Le Gall)

The Parisian did not panic. Matter of habit ? “I have already experienced this during a flight in Greece. The plane’s landing gear didn’t want to retract. We had turned over Rhodes to burn the kerosene and then we landed, without any worries, with the reception of 50 firefighters ready to help us ”.

“At that time, the time is very, very long”

At the front of the plane in flight to Guadeloupe, Lisa, 26, was traveling alone: ​​“At mealtime, we felt a kind of burning smell. At first I thought it was food but it was actually weird. It was a strong, rancid smell. Quite quickly, the flight attendant took the microphone to explain to us that there was a technical problem, that the plane was going to turn around to land at the nearest airport, since we were flying over the sea ​​at that time. Then I saw a hostess running down the hall, it wasn’t very reassuring. The hostess told us that we were going to apply the security procedure, that we had to look at the instructions again. There was a message asking those who wore glasses to take them off, and women who wore heels to take off their shoes. We were asked to put our heads at knee level, hands on the back of our necks. This is the security procedure. It’s very, very scary situation. From the time we were told there was a problem and the time we landed it was about 35-40 ‘. At that time, the time is very, very long. It showed, no one was very reassured on the plane but it was quite quiet. There was no panic. It’s a hyperstressing situation ”.

Memorable first for the young hostess

Among the eight hostesses and stewards of this Airbus A330, a young hostess crossed the Atlantic for the first time. “She was sitting next to me,” said a passenger, smoking a cigarette as she left the airport. “She stayed calm and told me it was a first big crossing for her. A first on the whole line! “.

“A hyperstressing situation”: on the tarmac in Brest, the passengers of the Paris-Guadeloupe flight recount the forced landing – Brest
And to think that tomorrow morning, we will have to get back on the plane for Pointe-à-Pitre… (Le Télégramme / Stéphane Jézéquel)

“We remained calm but it was boiling inside. We smelled like it was burnt and when the pilot told us that the incident was under control but that we had to find the nearest airport, some began to pray. We knew we were above the ocean, we wondered where it would find a place to land. We all asked where he was going to land. The hostesses did not have the answer. They ended up telling us Brest! We couldn’t wait! “.

“A hyperstressing situation”: on the tarmac in Brest, the passengers of the Paris-Guadeloupe flight recount the forced landing – Brest
François lived the longest minutes of his life. “I will not lie to you, yes I prayed”. (The Telegram / Stéphane Jézéquel)

“The hardest part will be getting back on the plane”

“And we applauded heartily when the pilot landed,” abounds François, in his thirties. “We would have liked him to come see us, we would have congratulated him! The hardest part will be getting back on the plane tomorrow! We will necessarily think about it. There is still the whole Atlantic to swallow! “.




letelegramme Fr Trans

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